Prehistoric sites

Algeria is abounded with archaeological sites dating back to the prehistoric period. Archaeological study has found human remains sites throughout the nation, beginning with Ain Lahnache, the earliest site of human habitation in North Africa. In addition to the Tighenif site, where the second oldest human being in North Africa is supposed to have lived, and the Neanderthal and Machti al-Arabi habi...

Tighenif Site

It has not crossed anyone before, that the important discovery, made by professor K. Armbourg in June 1954 would ennoble the village of Tighenif and give it international stature. This discovery was considered at the time a renowned international discovery in history, both nationally and internationally. Professor Armbourg had found three large human lower jawbones (mandibles), and part of a skull the volume of its brain estimated to be about 930 cm3 in Tighenif. Additionally, he had found some teeth that indicate the presence of huge creatures - humans - , who at the time were termed Atlanthropus Mauritanicus.

Learn more

Ain Lahnache Site

According to some scientists, the first sound stones found in the Ain Lahnache site, in addition to animal bone remains, are evidence to the settlement of humans in this location. These tools are nothing but polished and trimmed rocks as is seen through the remains of fragments that left holes after being ripped off from these locations. There is no doubt for human intervention is this making, on the contrary, it has become more obvious than ever. There are many types of stones that spread across South and East Africa, in locations that are now popular, and were previously thought to be natural. Such stones include pyramid-shaped stones, reclining stone, or meandering shaped stones.

Learn more

Tighenif Site

It has not crossed anyone before, that the important discovery, made by professor K. Armbourg in June 1954 would ennoble the village of Tighenif and give it international stature. This discovery was considered at the time a renowned international discovery in history, both nationally and internationally. Professor Armbourg had found three large human lower jawbones (mandibles), and part of a skull the volume of its brain estimated to be about 930 cm3 in Tighenif. Additionally, he had found some teeth that indicate the presence of huge creatures - humans - , who at the time were termed Atlanthropus Mauritanicus.

Ain Lahnache Site

According to some scientists, the first sound stones found in the Ain Lahnache site, in addition to animal bone remains, are evidence to the settlement of humans in this location. These tools are nothing but polished and trimmed rocks as is seen through the remains of fragments that left holes after being ripped off from these locations. There is no doubt for human intervention is this making, on the contrary, it has become more obvious than ever. There are many types of stones that spread across South and East Africa, in locations that are now popular, and were previously thought to be natural. Such stones include pyramid-shaped stones, reclining stone, or meandering shaped stones.